JOURNAL

Shriners For Children Medical Center Construction Tour

shriners_group-photo

Group sunset photo on the roof looking towards the foothills. Patient rooms are programmed to receive this same view within the PACU suite.

By: Don Kim

“We strive to design buildings that enrich the lives of the people who use them – buildings that gracefully fulfill functional and technical expectations, yet appeal as fully to the senses as to the intellect.”

This is perhaps the most fundamental part of CO’s mission statement, something I deeply believe in, and have the privilege of pursuing on a daily basis as a healthcare architect.

The new flagship facility for the Shriners organization in Pasadena is a project that explores this commitment to human life through evidence based design. I feel fortunate to have been a part of this for the last three years. It was enormously satisfying to share our project’s design ideas during a construction tour I helped give, with Ron Rendina and Ryan Lippman of DPR, to a group of fourth and fifth-year architecture students from Cal Poly Pomona studying healthcare architecture.

Public spaces are programmed to the south side on all three levels for maximum daylight. Direct sun can be uncomfortable in Pasadena even in the winter, so these spaces are protected by a series of deep, stepping, cantilevered canopies, carefully sized to shield them all the way until the winter solstice.

Public spaces are programmed to the south side on all three levels for maximum daylight. Direct sun can be uncomfortable in Pasadena even in the winter, so these spaces are protected by a series of deep, stepping, cantilevered canopies, carefully sized to shield them all the way until the winter solstice.

We emphasized access to nature: the outdoor rehabilitation garden, green roof physical therapy terrace, green roof staff terrace, and programming of patient views towards the foothills. We also spoke about active and passive daylighting strategies: automated light monitor louvers, integral-louver glass for borrowed natural light into ORs, and programming of public spaces towards the south under deep, cantilevered canopies. Finally, we showed them strategies for child comfort and distraction: color changing lights in the clean corridor, the light court play area in surgery waiting, and garden themed supergraphics.

Colorful supergraphics take on a garden theme—an homage to Pasadena’s rich history of flora and fauna. They are intended to provide comfort for children, while doubling as a wayfinding tool throughout the main clinic. Sparkling, color-changing lights in the clean corridor are intended to keep child patients distracted on their way into surgery.

Colorful supergraphics take on a garden theme—an homage to Pasadena’s rich history of flora and fauna. They are intended to provide comfort for children, while doubling as a wayfinding tool throughout the main clinic. Sparkling, color-changing lights in the clean corridor are intended to keep child patients distracted on their way into surgery.

These were features incorporated into this facility in a pursuit of patient, staff, and public well-being. And there is no organization more deserving of this design service than the Shriners Hospitals For Children, dedicated to the charitable care of children from all walks of life, regardless of race, color, creed, sex, sect, disability, national origin, or ability to pay.

For more information, visit: Shriners Hospitals for Children

The group looks at the integral louver glass along the surgery discharge corridor, which will bring borrowed light into the two ORs and brighten the post-surgery path that child patients take when returning to their families, while simultaneously reducing heat gain.

The group looks at the integral louver glass along the surgery discharge corridor, which will bring borrowed light into the two ORs and brighten the post-surgery path that child patients take when returning to their families, while simultaneously reducing heat gain.

 Board rooms feature overhead light monitors integrated with automated louvers, tied to occupancy sensors, lighting controls, and a sophisticated tracking system that throttles the apertures based on real time lighting conditions. Glare and heat gain are reduced, occupant comfort is maximized, and energy savings realized.

Board rooms feature overhead light monitors integrated with automated louvers, tied to occupancy sensors, lighting controls, and a sophisticated tracking system that throttles the apertures based on real time lighting conditions. Glare and heat gain are reduced, occupant comfort is maximized, and energy savings realized.

Board rooms feature overhead light monitors integrated with automated louvers, tied to occupancy sensors, lighting controls, and a sophisticated tracking system that throttles the apertures based on real time lighting conditions. Glare and heat gain are reduced, occupant comfort is maximized, and energy savings realized.

The physical therapy rehabilitation gym will be flooded with natural light with integral louver glass and an overhead skylight, along with views of nature to facilitate recovery and healing.

An outdoor light court filled with plants, trees, and rubber play surface mounds will bring natural light into the surgery waiting area at the deepest center of the floor plate. It will give the patients’ families a place to get fresh air and connect with nature, while providing siblings with a place to play and pass time during the surgery waiting process.

An outdoor light court filled with plants, trees, and rubber play surface mounds will bring natural light into the surgery waiting area at the deepest center of the floor plate. It will give the patients’ families a place to get fresh air and connect with nature, while providing siblings with a place to play and pass time during the surgery waiting process.

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